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Clicking the button will setup live, streaming video chat using your web cam and microphone, the button will setup a VOIP audio-only call using your microphone, and the button will allow you to select a photo on your device and instantly send it to your friend. SpeedNY Dating. In the notes section of my phone I keep a list of men I’ve met on online dates. Matt The Twat; Annoying Vegan Cycle Boy; Jamie Nice No Spark; The Bearded Canadian (Bit Odd). It’s like a dot-form diary of my recent romantic encounters, most of them born on a lonely Sunday-night-in, glass of shiraz in one hand, phone in the other. I arrived on the singles scene in 2015 with an aching heart and a lot to learn. “Nobody meets in real life anymore,” one friend told me firmly when I suggested a night out on the town, snatching my phone and clicking through to the app store.Seemingly overnight, dating apps had shifted from the desperate domain of the over-50s to the new normal. Every man and his dog were on Tinder – or every man and his sedated tiger, all dumb grins and flexed muscles bulging out of Bintang singlets. Initially hesitant, I got into the swing of it soon enough; window-shopping for boys from the comfort of your couch sure has its benefits, and amongst the beefed-up bodybuilders and BDSM buffs, there seemed to be a few potential suitors. I fronted up to my first online date with a healthy mix of hope and realism, aware that a chiseled jaw (in photos) and a bit of banter (via text) wouldn’t necessarily equate to chemistry or even amiability in the flesh. But on some subconscious level, I assumed I’d snag myself a good one – if not The One – before too long. After all, I have a clean record, wide smile and impeccable hygiene. rely finding a match wouldn’t be that difficult. The reality was rife with rejection. I met men who seemed keen but never texted again; men who only wanted sex; men who were rude to waiters (red flag); men who flirted with waiters (double red flag). And perhaps worst of all: men who were perfectly lovely and available, but with whom I just didn’t click. Then there was a whole new dating lexicon to learn and live: “Netflix and chill”, I soon discovered, didn’t involve vegging out in front of Stranger Things ; “ghosting” was when a love interest suddenly vanished from your life with zero explanation; and “zombieing” occurred when said ghost returned from the dead, sliding back into your DMs on an idle Wednesday evening. Recently, I was zombied by a guy I’d been chatting to on app-of-the-moment Hinge. He’d casually suggested a date then fallen off the face of the earth, only to reemerge four months later. “Hey stranger,” he wrote. “What happened to you?” I asked. “Nothing much, just some good old-fashioned app fatigue.” It was perhaps the most profound two words ever uttered to me online: app fatigue. After the initial buzz around mobile dating – a world of romantic possibility right there in your pocket – we’re tired of soulless swiping. In a recent survey by the BBC, 37 per cent of respondents deemed dating apps the “least preferred” method for meeting a spouse. plex algorithms now make it harder to make matches (unless you want to cough up for a premium membership), and despite tales of Tinder’s hot hook-up culture, research suggests millennials are actually having less sex than ever. But if we’re not searching for suitors on our smartphones, where are we going to find them? The last time I heard of a woman meeting her husband-to-be on a sweaty dance floor, she was grinding to “Gangnam Style” in a pair of Isabel Marant wedge sneakers. I guess that’s where I come in. My editor has challenged me to delete the apps and look for love offline. Goodbye, Hinge. Ta-ta, Tinder. Happn, I never really liked you anyway. My colleagues are more excited about the experiment than I am, eagerly spurting out ideas and advice. Cycling clubs, one tells me, are a breeding ground for men – fit and virile types who care about the planet too. But I’m from the school of thought that you can actually forget how to ride a bike (I learnt the hard way on an unfortunate jaunt in Copenhagen), plus I’ve always been suspicious of men in lycra. Instead, in the name of group activities, I sign up for a salsa class. It’s fun and sexy with cool Cuban beats and more hip-swivelling than I’ve done in a while – though thanks to a heavily skewed gender ratio, I spend most of the lesson partnered up with Maria, an Italian nonna who keeps mixing up her left and right. The next morning I tag along to my neighbour’s testosterone-filled boxing gym. There’s no shortage of decent-looking men loitering around, but the only thing they’re checking out is their biceps. In a moment of panic, I gather the girls for a night out. The pub in Bondi is swarming with polo-shirted guys and pretty girls in snake-print skirts. Not that they’re talking to one another – this is Sydney, after all. Even back before the advent of dating apps it wasn’t the easiest place to meet new people, but the cliques and crowds have since become considerably harder to crack. Because really, why would a man put himself out there and approach a woman IRL when he could do it from behind the safety of a screen?

After a round of espresso martinis I’m determined to shake up the status quo and find myself sauntering over to a cute guy by the bar. Let’s call him Bondi Boy – though with his short dark hair and no-logo tee he’s the antithesis of the yogi-yuppie stereotype. I’m not quite sure how we start chatting, but I have a horrible inkling it’s with me squeaking, “You’re cute!” We banter for a bit before he asks for my number and I shimmy back to the girls, who are now madly downing shots of tequila. I awake the next morning to a heavy head and a pinging phone. It’s Bondi Boy: “Hey, want to meet up today?” I agree to an afternoon coffee date and wander down to meet him by the beach. He’s shorter than I remember, but my heightism is quickly cancelled out by his kind eyes and our easy connection. We grab hot drinks then sit on the sand, chatting and laughing under grey-streaked skies. Coffee rolls into drinks at a local bar, then dinner at my favourite Mexican restaurant. It’s one of those great first dates where time loses all meaning; the kind that makes you feel calm and jittery all at once. Bondi Boy walks me home and gives me his jumper when the chill sets in. And then, as fat raindrops start to fall, he grabs my face and kisses me. I feel giddy as I open the front door, and my phone beeps before I’ve even put my bag down. “Can’t wait to see you again.” I have three main fears in life: ending up alone, elevator doors closing in on me, and speed dating. I’ve always physically recoiled at the mere idea of the latter, perhaps because it turns dating into a competitive sport. I like to win – yet after a series of failed online dates, you do start to wonder if you really suck at it. Tonight though, I’m letting go of my hang-ups and heading to an event organised by global matchmaking company MyCheekyDate. It’s also an opportunity for me to get over Bondi Boy. After three more (great) dates, he’s revealed he’s fresh out of an eight-year relationship and not ready for anything serious. I feel dejected, but also determined not to let it derail my experiment. Notably, I scored the last female ticket to the event, which means I’ll have to go alone. I get a friend to drive me and turn up 30 minutes late, a strategic move to miss the awkward small talk at the start. Walking in, it looks like your typical Saturday night at a slick city bar, except on closer inspection I see that the boys are all sitting on one side of the long candlelit table, girls on the other. As soon as I start chatting to my first guy, a computer engineer called Evan, my nerves dissolve. It’s actually pretty easy; the seven minutes fly by so quickly you barely have time to introduce yourself before a host appears and quietly taps the man to move down the line (in a bid for subtlety, MyCheekyDate nights are void of stopwatches, bells and whistles). Carrie Bradshaw once described first dates as “job interviews with cocktails”, and her words ring true here. Towards the end of the night, a burly Eastern European dater tells me he’s sick of sitting down and instead towers over me, firing questions and taking notes on his scorecard as I speak. But for the most part, the men are warm, interesting, even vulnerable. You can’t help but applaud them for putting themselves out there – leaving the house (and shelling out $35 for a ticket) already shows they’re more committed than the average sofa-bound swiper. Plus throughout the rapid meet-and-greet, you can instantly feel for chemistry, something even the techiest tech can’t account for (yet). So in that sense, it’s definitely more efficient than mobile dating. I feel a hint of something with one guy, a Brit with a dry sense of humour. The next morning I get an email from MyCheekyDate letting me know that we’ve matched, and make a note to email him during the week. I back it up with another singleton soiree, Dating With Dogs, the following afternoon. It’s the brainchild of Tatum Brown, who wanted to bring together lovelorn dog-lovers while raising funds for animal rescue groups. Genius. I borrow my friend’s cavoodle, Toby, and rock up to the pub. There are dogs everywhere: stocky staffies and goofy golden retrievers and preened little poodles. Unfortunately, there aren’t as many men. Women seem to outnumber them five to one. It’s a common theme I’m witnessing throughout this challenge, and it may speak to the fact that guys are just less socially organised than women. But it also suggests they don’t feel the same pressure or desire to couple up. I stand with a couple of other women and point out that the dogs seem more likely than us to get any action – one huge Pyrenees mountain dog keeps getting mounted by little mutts. But it’s not all bad news: I’m out and about on a bright Sunday afternoon playing with puppies and meeting new people. Face-to-face connection, whether romantic or otherwise, is a genuine benefit of this real-life-dating thing. And it’s having an effect on me, I realise, as I stroll up the street to do some shopping that evening. Not only has my screen-time halved, but I feel altogether more open. More open to possibility, more ready to muster some words together if I do meet a potential beau on the street. More confident to … I’m jolted out of my daydreams in the dairy aisle. I can see Bondi Boy mulling over the cheese. Which would be all well and good, except for the fact that I’m wearing his jumper. I repeat: Wearing. His. Jumper. My half-filled shopping basket practically falls out of my hand and I make a mad dash for the exit, unsure if Bondi Boy saw me, and unsure whether to laugh or cry. (For the record, that was the first time I’d worn his hoodie since he lent it to me on our date, grabbed randomly as I was running out the door.) That’s the thing about dating offline: for me it’s been tinged with disappointment and doubt, but at the very least, it’s provided some great fodder for my friends. And if I come away with a spin on the dance floor, a kiss in the rain and a major fear conquered, maybe, just maybe, it’s worth pursuing. I pull out my phone and create a new page of notes to document my real-world dates. First entry: Jumper Boy. And an expanse of blank space just waiting to be filled. Why your swipes on Hinge and OKCupid might be racist. Most Popular Today. More On: online dating. Burning heart: Online date ended in murder, arson, massive wildfire, and now two more deaths. Woman allegedly raped, man stabbed in neck during Tinder date gone wrong. Men and women don’t agree on pandemic sex, study reveals. ‘Sugar daddy’ dating site founder arrested twice amid prostitution, rape probes. In a new book, “The Dating Divide: Race and Desire in the Era of Online Romance,” sociologists Jennifer Lundquist, Celeste Vaughan Curington and Ken Hou-Lin show how online dating sites exacerbate racial divisions. They found that race-related “preference” filters on digital dating platforms help foster racist attitudes — especially toward black women. “The idea of having racial preferences is unacceptable and illegal in any other arena,” she added. “But it’s literally built into the structure of these dating apps.” (The 2014 study also found that preferring to date within one’s race was fairly common. For instance, black women preferred to date black men at a rate surpassed only by Asian women’s preference for Asian men.) For their book, Lundquist and her co-writers analyzed large-scale behavioral data from one of the leading dating sites in America. The authors declined to publicly reveal which digital dating platform they used for their research per a data-share agreement with the website. see also. Grindr to remove ethnicity filter in support of Black Lives Matter. The authors found that racial filtering on mating forums exposed black women to more exclusion and rejection than white, Latina and Asian female daters. Black women were the most likely to be excluded from searches, as well as the most likely recipients of offensive messages. “[It’s] this idea that it’s OK to say, ‘I prefer this race of people, and I don’t like this race of people for my romantic interest,’” Curington explained to The Post. While plenty of people have “a type” when it comes to dating, the researchers found that filtering for race also let “people feel free to express their biases and racial misogyny towards women of color in a way they typically wouldn’t in a face-to-face encounter,” Lundquist said. So, how did users go from being ignored to harassed? One possible explanation: When the average dating-app user doesn’t see black women because of the filters they’ve set, you end up with a higher percentage of users seeking black women as a “fetish.” For Nicole, a 39-year-old Afro Caribbean single mother from Brooklyn, receiving overly sexual overtures from non-black men on apps has become an unwelcome norm. “Right off the bat these guys are approaching me with, ‘Hey, sexy chocolate,’ or ‘I love your beautiful black body. Can you twerk?,’” the registered nurse told The Post. Nicole and other black daters who’ve endured racist attitudes while online dating declined to share their full names with The Post for privacy reasons. “I’m on these apps hoping to find a meaningful relationship and these guys are treating me like a sex object before even extending a proper ‘Hello,’” the Brooklyn resident added. The authors found that black women on matchmaking platforms must frequently contend with racist stereotypes such as the sexually insatiable “Jezebel,” which has roots in slavery, and the “angry black woman” — a belief that black women are innately unruly and ill-tempered. “We talked to a number of educated black women who were thriving in their careers and looking for comparable partners,” Curington told The Post. “But there’s a disconnect between who they are in real life versus the Jezebel stereotype they’re being subjected to online.” “I’m on these apps hoping to find a meaningful relationship and these guys are treating me like a sex object before even extending a proper ‘Hello.’” Nicole. Mish, a black executive assistant to C-suite business administrators, told The Post that her digital quest for companionship reaped a paltry handful of bad love connections. “I’m very turned off by dating sites now,” the 53-year-old Bronx native insisted. “They make me feel uneasy. Like I’m not being seen as the beautiful queen I am.” He was sexually aggressive during their first in-person meet-up last year. After finally engaging in consensual sex, he ghosted her. She later discovered he had a sordid history of fetishizing black women for his personal pleasures, then dumping them once he’d had his fun. . Monday, April 26th 7:00 PM. The Health Spot With Queen Adirah. Rosh Hashanah Service. You can find our service using one of these links: Bnai Adath Chanel www.youtube.com/channel/UCSnAeC3hwU8JL1C5epY0vMg www.youtube.com/channel/UCSnAeC3hwU8JL1C5epY0vMg. Rabbi Levy on NPR. Rosh Hashanah Message 2020 From Chief Rabbi Funnye. Rosh Hashanah/Yom Teruah 5781 1st (Tishrei) Ethanim 5781- September 19, 2020 Chief Rabbi Capers Shmuel Funnye Shabbat Shalom and Shana Tovah U’Metukah, this Shabbat day. Synagogues Slowly Reopen. When the COVID plague began in March, many congregations scrambled to provide services online using technology such as Zoom, Facebook, and Youtube. This was a. Israelite Virtual Conference August 23-29, 2020. convened by Zion House of Israel Temple K.O.Y. – Barbados – Caribbean In Association with Hebrew Families of Guyana; Congregation Beit Da’ath, Chokmah, Binah (D.C.B.) The Meaning of Tisha B’Av to Us: A Black Rabbi’s Perspective. The Meaning of Tisha B’Av to Us: A Black Rabbi’s Perspective By Rabbi Sholomo Ben Levy For Black Jews the meaning of Tisha B’Av is. Video Israelite Graduation Ceremony 2020. Table of Contents Time Marker Introduction Dr. Cooper 0:01 Welcome Address Rabbi Debra Bowen, Pennsylvania 2:25 Rabbi Benyamin Levy, 8:57 Gaverit Yitzchak, South Carolina 11:35. George Floyd Vigil– Rabbi Levy Speaks Out. Bar Mitzvah Omali Yisrael. Black Jews in Israel Seek Justice for George Floyd. Covid-19 Go Fund Me Campaign. The ICVC is raising money to assist groups helping others during COVID-19. We serve the needs of the community. The three pillars we stand on. Why We Count The Omer. COUNTING THE OMER KABBALISTICALLY Rabbi Sholomo Levy explains the history, meaning, and some of the mysteries of counting using the Kabbalistic method. In this video, he shows that the spiritual journey of counting in this manner helps us to reach a divine destination on Shavuot. Ruth and Boaz. Mother’s Day Program 2020. The Phenomenal Israelite Women’s Webinar Committee presents “AHAVAH”A WOMEN’S DAY OF LOVEIn Celebration of Womanhood Sunday May 10, 202011:00am until 1:00pm Via Zoom meeting Meeting ID: Essay Contest. April 25, 2020 Essay and Video Presentation Contest Peace and Love to All, During this season of our deliverance, we embraced our Passover (Pesach) and. Fast Mondays. Chief Rabbi Funnye and many other leaders of our community have proclaimed a solemn day of fasting and praying to begin this Monday, April 27, Passover Seder Details. Rabbis Conducting the Seder Chief Rabbi Funnye Rabbi Sholomo Levy Rabbi Baruch Yehudah Rabbi Yeshurun Levy Join Us Online For Passover Everyone is welcome Step-by-Step. Prayer Lines for Israelites. Here are the numbers to Israelite prayerlines and links to synagogues that stream their services for people to watch from home. You may join them. Racism Within the Jewish Community. In a series of interviews and articles, Elisheva Ester Rishon describes her racial odyssey of growing up as a black American in a white Orthodox. Chief Rabbi Funnye. Israelite Youth Shabbat. Schedule of Holy Days 2020. “These are the appointed festivals of the Lord” Leviticus 23 Holyday Date Service Times Erev Rosh Hashanah (Tashlich) Friday September 18 7:00 pm Rosh. Memories of the 2019 Centennial Celebration. The Meaning of this Commemoration Rabbi Sholomo Ben Levy This centennial is more than an anniversary for us. It is even more important than commemorating. Tribute to the Ancestors. Memories of Africa: A Son Returns by Rabbi Sholomo Levy. This is a year of return. Four hundred years ago, in 1619, the first African stepped onto the shores of Jamestown, Virginia. In many ways, that event was more significant than landing on the moon. In fact, one could argue that if those Africans had not proceeded to make the colonies rich, our history would be very different—if it existed at all. People have always wanted to measure time. Ancient man looked up at the night sky and began counting the number of days to complete the phases of the moon; that gave us months and eventually years. We poured sand through an hour-glass to achieve more precision. The strange thing about time is that even our most advanced clocks are instruments that can only measure the passage of time from some point in the present to some other point in the past. Nothing measures time in the future. And as we look back, we see patterns and cycles that seem to repeat; markers and turning points that tell us how low we sunk and how far we have come. This year is such a time of reflection. $500 Contest Web Designer. The Israelite Board of Rabbis is searching for a web designer in our community to upgrade our site. Visit www.blackjews.org for competition details. Design a. Make Your Own Matzah. Israelite Haggadah For Passover. This Haggadah was developed by the Israelite Board of Rabbis. It contains everything you need to celebrate the Passover seder. It is entirely unique because. Understanding the Hebrew Calendar. Family Bowling. Shalom Family: Please see attached flyer regarding the upcoming Family Bowling Day, sponsored by the Israelite Community Vision Council. Date: Sunday, February 10, 2019 Time: Hello world! Train Struck by Earthquake in Japan. Rental Bike Scheme to Come to Over 50 Stations. Nam aliquam egestas sem malesuada venenatis. Fusce ante elit, iaculis id dapibus sit amet, pharetra a odio. spendisse potenti. Cras faucibus risus sit amet leo. Famous Brand Fashion Week to begin from September 28. Aenean sollicitudin purus a nunc cursus, consectetur condimentum felis consequat. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Interdum et malesuada fames ac ante ipsum primis in faucibus. The Best Vegan and Vegetarian Restaurants. Sed lobortis tellus vitae orci vestibulum, eu pulvinar massa interdum. Nullam nec elit at nunc vestibulum tempor non ac justo. Nunc consequat est et vulputate. Review: Very Nice Italian Restaurant. Integer tempor risus at tincidunt gravida. Sed sollicitudin mattis massa, eu tincidunt urna tincidunt eu. Proin iaculis ligula vel nulla laoreet egestas. Nulla vulputate orci. New York City Legal Assistance. Included in this list are organizations that provide free or low-cost legal services to victims of abuse and others who qualify. Even if the organization does not have a lawyer available to represent you in court, you may want to ask if there is a lawyer who you can consult with to get advice. Please note that we list the organizations in the borough where the office is located – however, many offices may likely serve multiple boroughs. We indicate the “counties served” whenever possible. You can click the blue “View All” button to look through the complete list of organizations. Bronx. Offers free civil legal advice and representation in the areas of Public Benefits, Family Law, Immigration, and Education Law. They serve the Bronx only. They provide help with filing and processing Immigrant Visa Applications, assistance with renewing employment authorization cards, green cards, and temporary protected status, assistance with filing naturalization and citizenship applications, assistance with processing deferred action for childhood arrivals (DACA) applications, legal representation before U.S. citizenship and immigration Services and the immigration court, English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) classes, civics classes, counseling on resources for housing, financial, and health needs. Languages spoken: English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese dialects, French, Haitian Creole, Hebrew, Hindi, Garifuna, and Ibo. There are many other office locations in the Bronx, which you can find here: www.bronxworks.org/office-listings. Her Justice provides free legal help in family law, divorce and immigration to low-income women living in New York City. Most of our clients are survivors of domestic violence, though this is not a requirement. Services may include: Legal information, advice and referrals; Brief services (for example, drafting petitions and answers); Attorney representation. The Legal Aid Society’s Bronx Neighborhood Office provides assistance with civil cases including: divorce and related issues, custody, child and spousal support, domestic violence related immigration relief, guardianships and adoptions; Prevention of eviction, denial of access to public or government-subsidized housing or shelter, representation of tenant groups, illegal foreclosure and housing code violations; Public assistance, food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, SSI, Social Security disability and non-disability issues, foster care benefits, unemployment insurance benefits. Intake is done over the phone. They serve the Bronx. Legal Services NYC - Bronx’s areas of priority and special projects include: Housing; Government Benefits; Family Law (including domestic violence); Education Law; Consumer Law; Employment Law; Low Income Taxpayers Clinic; Immigration; Foreclosure Prevention (Bronx Foreclosure Center is located at 851 Grand Concourse Bronx, New York 10451) The FJCs provide many criminal justice, civil legal, and social services in one location to victims/survivors of domestic violence, trafficking and elder abuse. Services include safety planning and risk assessment, counseling for victims and their children, civil legal assistance on immigration and family court matters, meeting with a prosecutor, accessing shelter, applying for housing and financial assistance, filing police reports, language interpretation, and a wide-range of self-sufficiency services including English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes, financial literacy and counseling, computer skills classes, and many other services. Each FJC has a Children’s Room where children ages 3 and up can play in a safe and supervised space while their parents receive services. Appointments are not needed - you may just walk in to the FJC Monday through Friday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. To see a list of agencies that are housed at the FJC, see here: www.nyc.gov/html/ocdv/downloads/pdf/NYCFJC_List_Services.pdf. Upsolve is a legal aid clinic in New York City. It provides bankruptcy help to low-income clients. Upsolve serves residents in New York City. Brooklyn. They provide legal assistance and representation in a wide range of affirmative applications for immigration relief: Naturalization/citizenship, Family reunification, Employment authorization, Political asylum, T (trafficking victim) visas, U (crime witness/victim) visas, Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) protection, Temporary Protected Status (TPS), Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). There is a non-refundable $50 consultation fee related to affirmative filings. Fee waivers may be obtained upon providing proof of financial hardship. Immigration legal services are only available for clients residing in Brooklyn or Queens.Languages spoken: English, Spanish, Haitian Creole, French, Italian, Polish, Chinese Dialects. Her Justice provides free legal help in family law, divorce and immigration to low-income women living in New York City. Most of our clients are survivors of domestic violence, though this is not a requirement. Services may include: Legal information, advice and referrals; Brief services (for example, drafting petitions and answers); Attorney representation. Kayama is a not-for-profit organization for Jewish people that helps them obtain a “get,” which is a Jewish religious divorce. (They do not help with civil, non-religious divorces.) There is no charge for their services. They help people in all states, all countries. The Legal Aid Society’s Brooklyn Neighborhood Office provides legal assistance and representation for residents of Brooklyn. They assist with a variety of cases including: Divorce and related issues, custody, child and spousal support, domestic violence related immigration relief, guardianships and adoptions; Prevention of eviction, denial of access to public or government-subsidized housing or shelter, representation of tenant groups, illegal foreclosure and housing code violations; Public assistance, food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, SSI, Social Security disability and non-disability issues, foster care benefits, unemployment insurance benefits. Additional office for people over age 60:(718) 645-3111, www.legal-aid.org/en/las/findus/locations/brooklyn/brooklynoffice… Legal Services NYC - Brooklyn’s areas of priority and special projects include: Areas of Priority and Special Projects Include: Housing law; Family law (including domestic violence); Government Benefits; HIV/AIDS; Consumer law; Employment law; Health law; Education law; Rights of People with Disabilities; Community Education & Empowerment; Taxpayer Assistance; Immigration law; Foreclosure Prevention; Child Care. The FJCs provide many criminal justice, civil legal, and social services in one location to victims/survivors of domestic violence, trafficking and elder abuse. Services include safety planning and risk assessment, counseling for victims and their children, civil legal assistance on immigration and family court matters, meeting with a prosecutor, accessing shelter, applying for housing and financial assistance, filing police reports, language interpretation, and a wide-range of self-sufficiency services including English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes, financial literacy and counseling, computer skills classes, and many other services. Each FJC has a Children’s Room where children ages 3 and up can play in a safe and supervised space while their parents receive services. Appointments are not needed - you may just walk in to the FJC Monday through Friday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. To see a list of agencies that are housed at the FJC, see here: www.nyc.gov/html/ocdv/downloads/pdf/NYCFJC_List_Services.pdf. North Brooklyn Coalition Against Family Violence provides services to assist domestic violence victims, including: crisis intervention, counseling, emergency assistance, criminal justice advocacy, assistance in filing orders of protection, and direct representation and legal advocacy in family offense, custody/visitation, matrimonial cases, and domestic violence-based immigration relief. Safe Horizon’s Domestic Violence Law Project (DVLP) provides free representation to thousands of low-income and indigent victims of violence throughout NYC in orders of protection, custody, support, and divorce proceedings. DVLP attorneys also advocate for clients within the criminal justice system. Safe Horizon’s Immigration Law Project (ILP) provides free and low-cost services throughout NYC to victims of crime, torture, and abuse in immigration proceedings. ILP has represented hundreds of victims of violence in Violence Against Women Act self-petitions and adjustment proceedings as well as gender-based asylum claims. Se habla español. Sanctuary for Families provides domestic violence victims, sex trafficking victims, and their children with a range of comprehensive services. These services are provided in four boroughs; Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx. Some of the services that are offered are clinical services, legal services (including family law, matrimonial law, and immigration law and more), shelter services and children’s programs, etc. Services are also provided in Spanish. South Brooklyn Legal Services provides legal assistance to domestic violence victims and low-income residents of Brooklyn. They provide assistance with cases such as orders of protection, custody and visitation, child and spousal support, divorce, immigration issues related to domestic violence, economic and housing issues related to domestic violence, ACS, Foster Care and termination of parental rights. New York. Catholic Charities Community Services provides legal consultations, representation, and assistance to documented and undocumented newcomers regarding most immigration matters, including citizenship applications, family petitions, cases involving domestic violence, and cases that are in immigration court. Services are provided in English, Spanish, French, Romanian, Polish, Albanian, Japanese, and Arabic. Clients are charged nominal fees. Generally, our consultation fee is $50 ($85.00 for consultations with an attorney.) Fees for other services vary. Fees may be reduced or waived according to need. Note: There are additional office locations in Manhattan at Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Memorial Community Center, 34 W 134th St. New York, NY 10037 and Cardinal Spellman, 137 E 2nd St. New York, NY 10009. The City Bar Justice Center Legal Hotline offers legal information, advice and referrals to low-income New Yorkers who cannot afford a private attorney or do not have access to legal representation. The Hotline assists on a range of civil legal issues, including matrimonial and family law, housing law, domestic violence, bankruptcy, and debt collection and benefits. The service is bilingual, in English and Spanish, and can handle calls in any language through interpreting services. To apply for help online, go to cbjcoi.legalserver.org/modules/matter/extern_intake.php?pid=125&… The Legal Advocacy Helpline provides domestic violence survivors with immediate access to legal information and advocacy. Advocates provide callers with basic and in-depth information and advocacy concerning the police, district attorney, criminal and family court, probation and parole, and social services such as shelter, housing, public assistance, and immigration. The office is open Monday through Friday 9:30 am to 5pm. They serve New York City. Day One provides provides free and confidential counseling, case management as well as legal advice, information and direct representation to young people aged 24 and under related to dating abuse. They provide additional services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/gender non-conforming, queer and questioning youth who are struggling with intimate partner abuse. Their legal programs include assistance obtaining orders of protection, full representation at Family Court hearings for orders of protection, paternity, custody, visitation and child support, filing for domestic violence-based immigration relief such as VAWA petitions, Battered Spouse Waivers and U Visas, advocacy and support navigating the criminal justice system with the goal of obtaining a order of protection, assistance in obtaining a school safety transfer, advocacy and representation in administrative proceedings for public assistance, housing and other benefits and assistance with emancipation for young adults in need of public benefits and/or shelter due to intimate partner abuse. They also offer non-legal programs such as group counseling. They serve New York City. They provide services in English and in Spanish. HIAS is dedicated to ensuring that refugees know their rights, have access to legal aid, and that their host countries recognize their right to security. This includes preserving family unity in refuge, as well as the right to work, to medical attention, and for children to attend school – all the things that help them maintain their human dignity. They help refugees apply to countries around the world for resettlement. However, due to the small number of available slots, resettlement is typically approved only for the most vulnerable: women who are heads of households from cultures where men traditionally serve as protectors, orphaned or separated children, persecuted LGBT people, or survivors of torture. Additionally, we provide free legal representation for artists, scientists, scholars, and other professionals and their families who have been persecuted in their native country and who seek asylum in the United States through our Prins Program. Languages spoken: English, Russian, Spanish. Her Justice provides free legal help in family law, divorce and immigration to low-income women living in New York City. Most of our clients are survivors of domestic violence, though this is not a requirement. Services may include: Legal information, advice and referrals; Brief services (for example, drafting petitions and answers); Attorney representation. The Immigrant Defense Project promotes fundamental fairness for immigrants accused or convicted of crimes by working to transform unjust deportation laws and policies and educating and advising immigrants, their criminal defenders, and other advocates. IDP provides the only free criminal immigration hotline in the country. They offer criminal immigration analyses to criminal defenders, immigration advocates, and immigrants and their loved ones. They also provide information for immigrants related to criminal convictions on their website here: immigrantdefenseproject.org/resources/legal-resources They serve all boroughs. Legal Aid Society provides assistance with civil cases including: Divorce and related issues, custody, child and spousal support, domestic violence related immigration relief, guardianships and adoptions; Prevention of eviction, denial of access to public or government-subsidized housing or shelter, representation of tenant groups, illegal foreclosure and housing code violations; Public assistance, food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, SSI, Social Security disability and non-disability issues, foster care benefits, unemployment insurance benefits. Intake is done over the phone. They serve Manhattan. For more information about the Harlem Community Office services, go to www.legal-aid.org/en/las/findus/locations/manhattan/harlemcommuni… For more information about the Lower Manhattan Office services, go to: www.legal-aid.org/en/las/findus/locations/manhattan/lowermanhatta… Legal Services NYC has various offices. This office, the Legal Support Unit, has the following Practice Areas and Projects for low-income NYC residents: the New York City Bankruptcy Assistance Project (NYC BAP) provides free bankruptcy assistance; the Disability Advocacy Project (DAP) helps disabled children and adults get Social Security disability benefits and move off welfare; the education unit advocates for/represents special education students; Family law: representation to victims of domestic violence in obtaining divorces, orders of protection, custody, child support, and child neglect and abuse; the Foreclosure Prevention Project provides legal advice and representation to homeowners; Government benefits: provides legal advice, representation and training in matters relating to Public Assistance, Food Stamp and Medicaid benefits; help for HIV-positive individuals with issues related to housing, public benefits and more; Housing: representing tenants faced with eviction; Immigration issues such as Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), U visas (for crime victims) and more. See www.legalservicesnyc.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&i… for more information. LeGaL sponsors a lawyer referral service directing clients to private attorneys in NYC who are sensitive to LGBT issues. They also offer several pro bono legal clinics devoted to serving the LGBTQ community. Manhattan Legal Services represents and advises low-income residents of Manhattan who need help with civil legal problems in the areas of housing law, government benefits, Supplemental Security Income/Social Security, unemployment, family law (including domestic violence), employment law, immigration law, consumer and education law. In addition to these core civil legal services, Manhattan Legal Services’ special projects include the East Side SRO (Single Room Occupancy) Law Project, the Disability Advocacy Project, a general litigation HIV Unit, and a nationally recognized Domestic Violence Unit. The FJCs provide many criminal justice, civil legal, and social services in one location to victims/survivors of domestic violence, trafficking and elder abuse. Services include safety planning and risk assessment, counseling for victims and their children, civil legal assistance on immigration and family court matters, meeting with a prosecutor, accessing shelter, applying for housing and financial assistance, filing police reports, language interpretation, and a wide-range of self-sufficiency services including English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes, financial literacy and counseling, computer skills classes, and many other services. Each FJC has a Children’s Room where children ages 3 and up can play in a safe and supervised space while their parents receive services. Appointments are not needed - you may just walk in to the FJC Monday through Friday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. To see a list of agencies that are housed at the FJC, see here: www.nyc.gov/html/ocdv/downloads/pdf/NYCFJC_List_Services.pdf. NYLAG helps victims of domestic violence in NYC with holistic representation in cases of divorce, custody, adoption, visitation, and spousal and child support. NYLAG also provides help on general civil legal issues including consumer credit, elder law, employment law, foreclosure prevention, housing, and public benefits cases, including disability, food stamps, home care, Medicaid/Medicare. NYLAG helps immigrants with citizenship, legal residency, work authorizations, visas, removal defense, public benefits and community outreach. There are additional legal services provided in additional areas of law. To see all of the services provided, go to nylag.org/units. NYLAG’s Project Eden works with the Orthodox Jewish community to raise awareness of domestic violence and make resources available to victims. Project Eden helps Orthodox Jewish women who are victims of domestic violence. Services include legal representation on divorces, child/spousal support, and orders of protection etc. They also provide information on safety planning. They provide family-based immigration services including one-on-one legal consultations and application assistance on issues such as: adjustment of legal status, filing for citizenship and naturalization and family-based petitions. Provides services in English and Spanish. Sanctuary for Families provides domestic violence victims, sex trafficking victims, and their children with a range of comprehensive services. These services are provided in four boroughs; Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx. Some of the services that are offered are clinical services, legal services (including family law, matrimonial law, and immigration law and more), shelter services and children’s programs, etc. Services are also provided in Spanish. Sanctuary for Families provides domestic violence victims, sex trafficking victims, and their children with a range of comprehensive services. These services are provided in four boroughs; Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx. Some of the services that are offered are clinical services, legal services (including family law, matrimonial law, and immigration law and more), shelter services and children’s programs, etc. Services are also provided in Spanish. This office is in a confidential location. Sylvia Rivera Law Project provides direct representation for low-income transgender people and transgender people of color in three main areas. rvival & Self Determination Project: Name Changes, Assistance Obtaining and Updating ID Documents, Health Care Advocacy, Criminal History/Fingerprinting; Immigrant Rights Project: Name Changes, Assistance Updating Immigration Documents, Adjustment of Status, Naturalization, Removal Defense, Asylum; and a Prisoner Rights Project. They serve the five boroughs of New York City. They provide services in English and in Spanish. Provides services to NYC youth, aged 12 to 21. They help to provide legal services to the following people: recent immigrants, undocumented immigrants (living in the United States without the proper paperwork), those currently in deportation proceedings; people in foster care; pregnant or caring for a child; homeless and/or living without your parents, or people having issues with their landlord; in need of public benefits, such as Section 8 housing, food stamps, Medicaid or welfare, Social Security, etc. They also help people in need of help with family law issues such as paternity, child support, domestic violence, child custody and visitation rights; people being victimized or stalked; those in need of proper forms of personal identification, such as a birth certificate, passport, non-driver’s license, etc. To see a list of other (non-legal) services provided, see here: www.door.org/programs-services. The New Start Project prepares paperwork for Uncontested Divorces as well as Separation Agreements for residents of the 5 boroughs of NYC and parts of Long Island and Westchester as well. They also assist with the preparation of limited Contested Divorce Paperwork such as Notice of Appearances and Answers. They do not provide representation. Their fees are based on a sliding scale ranging from $100 to $500 for the entire service from start to finish. No client will be turned away for inability to pay. Provides legal and social services for victims of domestic violence. Services include representation and legal advocacy, including for immigration cases for DV victims in all 5 boroughs on U-Visa, VAWA and SIJS matters; crisis counseling; and empowerment groups. The Urban Justice Center also has 9 other projects, which you can read about here: www.urbanjustice.org/node/497. New York. Volunteers of Legal Service (VOLS) provides pro bono civil legal assistance to low-income New Yorkers. VOLS’ has many projects designed to serve low-income individuals and families based on their legal needs. The School-based Children’s Project helps low-income families resolve legal problems that interfere with their children’s ability to learn. The Hospital-based Children’s Project lawyers, doctors, nurses, and social workers work together to identify and resolve legal issues that may affect outcomes of children from low-income families. The Elderly Project’s staff and lawyers provide free legal advice, information, document drafting, and other brief services to low-income Manhattan residents aged 60 and over, and to the social workers and advocates who assist them. The Immigration Project works to resolve immigration issues for New York City public high school students so that they can work, attend college and have an opportunity to achieve the American Dream. Incarcerated Mothers Law Project provides legal advice, information, and advocacy to women in jail or prison. Microenterprise Project serves small business owners with legal issues such as entity selection and formation, commercial leasing, intellectual property, and contracts. Unemployment Insurance Advocacy Project serves New Yorkers who have been denied unemployment benefits at administrative hearings. New York City Legal Assistance. Included in this list are organizations that provide free or low-cost legal services to victims of abuse and others who qualify. Even if the organization does not have a lawyer available to represent you in court, you may want to ask if there is a lawyer who you can consult with to get advice. Please note that we list the organizations in the borough where the office is located – however, many offices may likely serve multiple boroughs. We indicate the “counties served” whenever possible. You can click the blue “View All” button to look through the complete list of organizations. Bronx. Offers free civil legal advice and representation in the areas of Public Benefits, Family Law, Immigration, and Education Law. They serve the Bronx only. They provide help with filing and processing Immigrant Visa Applications, assistance with renewing employment authorization cards, green cards, and temporary protected status, assistance with filing naturalization and citizenship applications, assistance with processing deferred action for childhood arrivals (DACA) applications, legal representation before U.S. citizenship and immigration Services and the immigration court, English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) classes, civics classes, counseling on resources for housing, financial, and health needs. Languages spoken: English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese dialects, French, Haitian Creole, Hebrew, Hindi, Garifuna, and Ibo. There are many other office locations in the Bronx, which you can find here: www.bronxworks.org/office-listings. Her Justice provides free legal help in family law, divorce and immigration to low-income women living in New York City. Most of our clients are survivors of domestic violence, though this is not a requirement. Services may include: Legal information, advice and referrals; Brief services (for example, drafting petitions and answers); Attorney representation. The Legal Aid Society’s Bronx Neighborhood Office provides assistance with civil cases including: divorce and related issues, custody, child and spousal support, domestic violence related immigration relief, guardianships and adoptions; Prevention of eviction, denial of access to public or government-subsidized housing or shelter, representation of tenant groups, illegal foreclosure and housing code violations; Public assistance, food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, SSI, Social Security disability and non-disability issues, foster care benefits, unemployment insurance benefits. Intake is done over the phone. They serve the Bronx. Legal Services NYC - Bronx’s areas of priority and special projects include: Housing; Government Benefits; Family Law (including domestic violence); Education Law; Consumer Law; Employment Law; Low Income Taxpayers Clinic; Immigration; Foreclosure Prevention (Bronx Foreclosure Center is located at 851 Grand Concourse Bronx, New York 10451) The FJCs provide many criminal justice, civil legal, and social services in one location to victims/survivors of domestic violence, trafficking and elder abuse. Services include safety planning and risk assessment, counseling for victims and their children, civil legal assistance on immigration and family court matters, meeting with a prosecutor, accessing shelter, applying for housing and financial assistance, filing police reports, language interpretation, and a wide-range of self-sufficiency services including English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes, financial literacy and counseling, computer skills classes, and many other services. Each FJC has a Children’s Room where children ages 3 and up can play in a safe and supervised space while their parents receive services. Appointments are not needed - you may just walk in to the FJC Monday through Friday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. To see a list of agencies that are housed at the FJC, see here: www.nyc.gov/html/ocdv/downloads/pdf/NYCFJC_List_Services.pdf. Upsolve is a legal aid clinic in New York City. It provides bankruptcy help to low-income clients. Upsolve serves residents in New York City. Brooklyn. They provide legal assistance and representation in a wide range of affirmative applications for immigration relief: Naturalization/citizenship, Family reunification, Employment authorization, Political asylum, T (trafficking victim) visas, U (crime witness/victim) visas, Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) protection, Temporary Protected Status (TPS), Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). There is a non-refundable $50 consultation fee related to affirmative filings. Fee waivers may be obtained upon providing proof of financial hardship. Immigration legal services are only available for clients residing in Brooklyn or Queens.Languages spoken: English, Spanish, Haitian Creole, French, Italian, Polish, Chinese Dialects. Her Justice provides free legal help in family law, divorce and immigration to low-income women living in New York City. Most of our clients are survivors of domestic violence, though this is not a requirement. Services may include: Legal information, advice and referrals; Brief services (for example, drafting petitions and answers); Attorney representation. Kayama is a not-for-profit organization for Jewish people that helps them obtain a “get,” which is a Jewish religious divorce. (They do not help with civil, non-religious divorces.) There is no charge for their services. They help people in all states, all countries. The Legal Aid Society’s Brooklyn Neighborhood Office provides legal assistance and representation for residents of Brooklyn. They assist with a variety of cases including: Divorce and related issues, custody, child and spousal support, domestic violence related immigration relief, guardianships and adoptions; Prevention of eviction, denial of access to public or government-subsidized housing or shelter, representation of tenant groups, illegal foreclosure and housing code violations; Public assistance, food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, SSI, Social Security disability and non-disability issues, foster care benefits, unemployment insurance benefits. Additional office for people over age 60:(718) 645-3111, www.legal-aid.org/en/las/findus/locations/brooklyn/brooklynoffice… Legal Services NYC - Brooklyn’s areas of priority and special projects include: Areas of Priority and Special Projects Include: Housing law; Family law (including domestic violence); Government Benefits; HIV/AIDS; Consumer law; Employment law; Health law; Education law; Rights of People with Disabilities; Community Education & Empowerment; Taxpayer Assistance; Immigration law; Foreclosure Prevention; Child Care. The FJCs provide many criminal justice, civil legal, and social services in one location to victims/survivors of domestic violence, trafficking and elder abuse. Services include safety planning and risk assessment, counseling for victims and their children, civil legal assistance on immigration and family court matters, meeting with a prosecutor, accessing shelter, applying for housing and financial assistance, filing police reports, language interpretation, and a wide-range of self-sufficiency services including English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes, financial literacy and counseling, computer skills classes, and many other services. Each FJC has a Children’s Room where children ages 3 and up can play in a safe and supervised space while their parents receive services. Appointments are not needed - you may just walk in to the FJC Monday through Friday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. To see a list of agencies that are housed at the FJC, see here: www.nyc.gov/html/ocdv/downloads/pdf/NYCFJC_List_Services.pdf. North Brooklyn Coalition Against Family Violence provides services to assist domestic violence victims, including: crisis intervention, counseling, emergency assistance, criminal justice advocacy, assistance in filing orders of protection, and direct representation and legal advocacy in family offense, custody/visitation, matrimonial cases, and domestic violence-based immigration relief. Safe Horizon’s Domestic Violence Law Project (DVLP) provides free representation to thousands of low-income and indigent victims of violence throughout NYC in orders of protection, custody, support, and divorce proceedings. DVLP attorneys also advocate for clients within the criminal justice system. Safe Horizon’s Immigration Law Project (ILP) provides free and low-cost services throughout NYC to victims of crime, torture, and abuse in immigration proceedings. ILP has represented hundreds of victims of violence in Violence Against Women Act self-petitions and adjustment proceedings as well as gender-based asylum claims. Se habla español. Sanctuary for Families provides domestic violence victims, sex trafficking victims, and their children with a range of comprehensive services. These services are provided in four boroughs; Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx. Some of the services that are offered are clinical services, legal services (including family law, matrimonial law, and immigration law and more), shelter services and children’s programs, etc. Services are also provided in Spanish. South Brooklyn Legal Services provides legal assistance to domestic violence victims and low-income residents of Brooklyn. They provide assistance with cases such as orders of protection, custody and visitation, child and spousal support, divorce, immigration issues related to domestic violence, economic and housing issues related to domestic violence, ACS, Foster Care and termination of parental rights. New York. Catholic Charities Community Services provides legal consultations, representation, and assistance to documented and undocumented newcomers regarding most immigration matters, including citizenship applications, family petitions, cases involving domestic violence, and cases that are in immigration court. Services are provided in English, Spanish, French, Romanian, Polish, Albanian, Japanese, and Arabic. Clients are charged nominal fees. Generally, our consultation fee is $50 ($85.00 for consultations with an attorney.) Fees for other services vary. Fees may be reduced or waived according to need. Note: There are additional office locations in Manhattan at Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Memorial Community Center, 34 W 134th St. New York, NY 10037 and Cardinal Spellman, 137 E 2nd St. New York, NY 10009. The City Bar Justice Center Legal Hotline offers legal information, advice and referrals to low-income New Yorkers who cannot afford a private attorney or do not have access to legal representation. The Hotline assists on a range of civil legal issues, including matrimonial and family law, housing law, domestic violence, bankruptcy, and debt collection and benefits. The service is bilingual, in English and Spanish, and can handle calls in any language through interpreting services. To apply for help online, go to cbjcoi.legalserver.org/modules/matter/extern_intake.php?pid=125&… The Legal Advocacy Helpline provides domestic violence survivors with immediate access to legal information and advocacy. Advocates provide callers with basic and in-depth information and advocacy concerning the police, district attorney, criminal and family court, probation and parole, and social services such as shelter, housing, public assistance, and immigration. The office is open Monday through Friday 9:30 am to 5pm. They serve New York City. Day One provides provides free and confidential counseling, case management as well as legal advice, information and direct representation to young people aged 24 and under related to dating abuse. They provide additional services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/gender non-conforming, queer and questioning youth who are struggling with intimate partner abuse. Their legal programs include assistance obtaining orders of protection, full representation at Family Court hearings for orders of protection, paternity, custody, visitation and child support, filing for domestic violence-based immigration relief such as VAWA petitions, Battered Spouse Waivers and U Visas, advocacy and support navigating the criminal justice system with the goal of obtaining a order of protection, assistance in obtaining a school safety transfer, advocacy and representation in administrative proceedings for public assistance, housing and other benefits and assistance with emancipation for young adults in need of public benefits and/or shelter due to intimate partner abuse. They also offer non-legal programs such as group counseling. They serve New York City. They provide services in English and in Spanish. HIAS is dedicated to ensuring that refugees know their rights, have access to legal aid, and that their host countries recognize their right to security. This includes preserving family unity in refuge, as well as the right to work, to medical attention, and for children to attend school – all the things that help them maintain their human dignity. They help refugees apply to countries around the world for resettlement. However, due to the small number of available slots, resettlement is typically approved only for the most vulnerable: women who are heads of households from cultures where men traditionally serve as protectors, orphaned or separated children, persecuted LGBT people, or survivors of torture. Additionally, we provide free legal representation for artists, scientists, scholars, and other professionals and their families who have been persecuted in their native country and who seek asylum in the United States through our Prins Program. Languages spoken: English, Russian, Spanish. Her Justice provides free legal help in family law, divorce and immigration to low-income women living in New York City. Most of our clients are survivors of domestic violence, though this is not a requirement. Services may include: Legal information, advice and referrals; Brief services (for example, drafting petitions and answers); Attorney representation. The Immigrant Defense Project promotes fundamental fairness for immigrants accused or convicted of crimes by working to transform unjust deportation laws and policies and educating and advising immigrants, their criminal defenders, and other advocates. IDP provides the only free criminal immigration hotline in the country. They offer criminal immigration analyses to criminal defenders, immigration advocates, and immigrants and their loved ones. They also provide information for immigrants related to criminal convictions on their website here: immigrantdefenseproject.org/resources/legal-resources They serve all boroughs. Legal Aid Society provides assistance with civil cases including: Divorce and related issues, custody, child and spousal support, domestic violence related immigration relief, guardianships and adoptions; Prevention of eviction, denial of access to public or government-subsidized housing or shelter, representation of tenant groups, illegal foreclosure and housing code violations; Public assistance, food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, SSI, Social Security disability and non-disability issues, foster care benefits, unemployment insurance benefits. Intake is done over the phone. They serve Manhattan. For more information about the Harlem Community Office services, go to www.legal-aid.org/en/las/findus/locations/manhattan/harlemcommuni… For more information about the Lower Manhattan Office services, go to: www.legal-aid.org/en/las/findus/locations/manhattan/lowermanhatta… Legal Services NYC has various offices. This office, the Legal Support Unit, has the following Practice Areas and Projects for low-income NYC residents: the New York City Bankruptcy Assistance Project (NYC BAP) provides free bankruptcy assistance; the Disability Advocacy Project (DAP) helps disabled children and adults get Social Security disability benefits and move off welfare; the education unit advocates for/represents special education students; Family law: representation to victims of domestic violence in obtaining divorces, orders of protection, custody, child support, and child neglect and abuse; the Foreclosure Prevention Project provides legal advice and representation to homeowners; Government benefits: provides legal advice, representation and training in matters relating to Public Assistance, Food Stamp and Medicaid benefits; help for HIV-positive individuals with issues related to housing, public benefits and more; Housing: representing tenants faced with eviction; Immigration issues such as Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), U visas (for crime victims) and more. See www.legalservicesnyc.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&i… for more information. LeGaL sponsors a lawyer referral service directing clients to private attorneys in NYC who are sensitive to LGBT issues. They also offer several pro bono legal clinics devoted to serving the LGBTQ community. Manhattan Legal Services represents and advises low-income residents of Manhattan who need help with civil legal problems in the areas of housing law, government benefits, Supplemental Security Income/Social Security, unemployment, family law (including domestic violence), employment law, immigration law, consumer and education law. In addition to these core civil legal services, Manhattan Legal Services’ special projects include the East Side SRO (Single Room Occupancy) Law Project, the Disability Advocacy Project, a general litigation HIV Unit, and a nationally recognized Domestic Violence Unit. The FJCs provide many criminal justice, civil legal, and social services in one location to victims/survivors of domestic violence, trafficking and elder abuse. Services include safety planning and risk assessment, counseling for victims and their children, civil legal assistance on immigration and family court matters, meeting with a prosecutor, accessing shelter, applying for housing and financial assistance, filing police reports, language interpretation, and a wide-range of self-sufficiency services including English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes, financial literacy and counseling, computer skills classes, and many other services. Each FJC has a Children’s Room where children ages 3 and up can play in a safe and supervised space while their parents receive services. Appointments are not needed - you may just walk in to the FJC Monday through Friday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. To see a list of agencies that are housed at the FJC, see here: www.nyc.gov/html/ocdv/downloads/pdf/NYCFJC_List_Services.pdf. NYLAG helps victims of domestic violence in NYC with holistic representation in cases of divorce, custody, adoption, visitation, and spousal and child support. NYLAG also provides help on general civil legal issues including consumer credit, elder law, employment law, foreclosure prevention, housing, and public benefits cases, including disability, food stamps, home care, Medicaid/Medicare. NYLAG helps immigrants with citizenship, legal residency, work authorizations, visas, removal defense, public benefits and community outreach. There are additional legal services provided in additional areas of law. To see all of the services provided, go to nylag.org/units. NYLAG’s Project Eden works with the Orthodox Jewish community to raise awareness of domestic violence and make resources available to victims. Project Eden helps Orthodox Jewish women who are victims of domestic violence. Services include legal representation on divorces, child/spousal support, and orders of protection etc. They also provide information on safety planning. They provide family-based immigration services including one-on-one legal consultations and application assistance on issues such as: adjustment of legal status, filing for citizenship and naturalization and family-based petitions. Provides services in English and Spanish. Sanctuary for Families provides domestic violence victims, sex trafficking victims, and their children with a range of comprehensive services. These services are provided in four boroughs; Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx. Some of the services that are offered are clinical services, legal services (including family law, matrimonial law, and immigration law and more), shelter services and children’s programs, etc. Services are also provided in Spanish. Sanctuary for Families provides domestic violence victims, sex trafficking victims, and their children with a range of comprehensive services. These services are provided in four boroughs; Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx. Some of the services that are offered are clinical services, legal services (including family law, matrimonial law, and immigration law and more), shelter services and children’s programs, etc. Services are also provided in Spanish. This office is in a confidential location. Sylvia Rivera Law Project provides direct representation for low-income transgender people and transgender people of color in three main areas. rvival & Self Determination Project: Name Changes, Assistance Obtaining and Updating ID Documents, Health Care Advocacy, Criminal History/Fingerprinting; Immigrant Rights Project: Name Changes, Assistance Updating Immigration Documents, Adjustment of Status, Naturalization, Removal Defense, Asylum; and a Prisoner Rights Project. They serve the five boroughs of New York City. They provide services in English and in Spanish. Provides services to NYC youth, aged 12 to 21. They help to provide legal services to the following people: recent immigrants, undocumented immigrants (living in the United States without the proper paperwork), those currently in deportation proceedings; people in foster care; pregnant or caring for a child; homeless and/or living without your parents, or people having issues with their landlord; in need of public benefits, such as Section 8 housing, food stamps, Medicaid or welfare, Social Security, etc. They also help people in need of help with family law issues such as paternity, child support, domestic violence, child custody and visitation rights; people being victimized or stalked; those in need of proper forms of personal identification, such as a birth certificate, passport, non-driver’s license, etc. To see a list of other (non-legal) services provided, see here: www.door.org/programs-services. The New Start Project prepares paperwork for Uncontested Divorces as well as Separation Agreements for residents of the 5 boroughs of NYC and parts of Long Island and Westchester as well. They also assist with the preparation of limited Contested Divorce Paperwork such as Notice of Appearances and Answers. They do not provide representation. Their fees are based on a sliding scale ranging from $100 to $500 for the entire service from start to finish. No client will be turned away for inability to pay. Provides legal and social services for victims of domestic violence. Services include representation and legal advocacy, including for immigration cases for DV victims in all 5 boroughs on U-Visa, VAWA and SIJS matters; crisis counseling; and empowerment groups. The Urban Justice Center also has 9 other projects, which you can read about here: www.urbanjustice.org/node/497. New York. Volunteers of Legal Service (VOLS) provides pro bono civil legal assistance to low-income New Yorkers. VOLS’ has many projects designed to serve low-income individuals and families based on their legal needs. The School-based Children’s Project helps low-income families resolve legal problems that interfere with their children’s ability to learn. The Hospital-based Children’s Project lawyers, doctors, nurses, and social workers work together to identify and resolve legal issues that may affect outcomes of children from low-income families. The Elderly Project’s staff and lawyers provide free legal advice, information, document drafting, and other brief services to low-income Manhattan residents aged 60 and over, and to the social workers and advocates who assist them. The Immigration Project works to resolve immigration issues for New York City public high school students so that they can work, attend college and have an opportunity to achieve the American Dream. Incarcerated Mothers Law Project provides legal advice, information, and advocacy to women in jail or prison. Microenterprise Project serves small business owners with legal issues such as entity selection and formation, commercial leasing, intellectual property, and contracts. Unemployment Insurance Advocacy Project serves New Yorkers who have been denied unemployment benefits at administrative hearings.


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